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Briefs: Tinucci Retires; Beard Foundation Innovates




Elizabeth, John and Carrie Tinucci.

The two St. Paul Colossal Cafes will remain open under the ownership of Elizabeth Tinucci, but her father, John Tinucci, officially retired (and the third partner, her mother, Carrie, has a full-time job elsewhere) and therefore, the Minneapolis location has shuttered its doors after a short run. On the last Friday of September friends and colleagues gathered at the Como Avenue location to wish John well. The food, which made a steady appearance from the kitchen, was courtesy of Reinhart. Tinucci grew up in the restaurant business; his father started Tinucci’s in Newport more than 50 years ago.

 

Madison Area Technical College and The Vollrath Company, a commercial foodservice equipment and supplies outfit, have partnered to host the annual Madison College Chef Series. Throughout the 2018-19 school year, eight chefs will present to students and the public about their entrepreneurial journey and challenges they faced along the way. 

 

The James Beard Foundation is changing with the times by updating its rules and regulations to make awards more inclusive, according to the New York Times. The awards have come under fire lately, the newspaper said, for not doing enough to fight race and gender imbalances in the restaurant industry. In addition to changing some of its requirements, the organization will no longer add people to its list of Who’s Who of Food and Beverage in America, since it includes men who have been caught up in sexual abuse and harassment scandals, including high-profile chefs, Mario Batali and John Besh. A restaurant’s culture and leadership values will receive additional attention, along with more time for fact-checking, the foundation said in a statement picked up by the Times. 

 

InHarvest promoted Chris Bybee from corporate chef to corporate chef manager. In his new role, Bybee manages and prioritizes culinary team activities as well as helps streamline InHarvest’s “Culinary First” model.  “His passion for food, values as a culinarian and environmentalist, and keen understanding of the many needs of a diverse customer base position him perfectly with our company’s goals as a leading manufacturer and supplier of some of the world’s most distinctive whole grains, legumes and signature grain blends for the foodservice, retail and industrial sectors of the food industry,” said Michael Holleman, InHarvest’s director of culinary development  and marketing.

 

Being right across the street from the Orpheum Theater during its run with the wildly popular “Hamilton” benefited Mercy and increased numbers of diners, thanks in part to its embracing of the rap/musical. Theater-goers could choose from a three-course Hamilton Menu with recipes based in part from the late-1700s, such as chilled asparagus or white bean and ham hock soup for the first course and boeuf a la mode (pot roast) or lobster mac and cheese (which was created by Chef James Hemmings for President Thomas Jefferson’s guests. “We just added the lobster, cause it’s Mercy and we love seafood,” the menu explained.) The showstopper, however, was the 1800s snow egg: vanilla ice cream encapsulated in a poached meringue served with chocolate cherries and bananas with a brandy sabayon. But even better was the host telling guests to run back across the street during the intermission to use their restrooms and avoid the long Orpheum lines. 

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